BYC Jib Sheet September 1998 <>

September 1998

Jib Sheet

Contents of this issue

Don't Forget the Upcoming 1998 Great Bellingham Bay Predicted Log Race

John Gargett

September 12 € Bellingham Yacht Club

Predicted Log Contests are similar to road rallies on the water. It is a contest where skippers attempt to most accurately predict the time it will take to navigate a specified course in their boat. The course will be provided the morning of the race. Before departing for the race, skippers will turn in predicted logs that specify the time they expect to use on each leg of the course. Skippers then start onto the course at their predicted starting time. After starting, an Observer (one will be assigned to you the morning of the race) aboard the boat collects all watches so that the skipper and crew have no knowledge of the actual time during the contest. As each mark is passed, the Observer records the time on the actual log. After completing the course, the Race Committee will compute the percentage error between the predicted and actual logs for each boat. The skipper with the lowest error is then declared the winner. All it takes is:

A Boat.----- A Compass.----- A Tachometer.----- A Chart.

This predicted log race will be a short, but fun, race. Since it has been a while since BYC has had a predicted log race, the goal for this one will be to have fun, yet try to see who can best predict how accurate their knowledge is about their boats speed. We are setting this up so any boat is welcome to enter. All you need to do to sign up is to contact either the BYC Club, or John Gargett (734-4115 email: jgargett@az.com) That's it! (And show up at 1000 on Saturday the 12th)

On race day, we will begin at 1000 sharp with a skippers meeting which will be held in the Ward Room at the club. At the skippers meeting, you will be given the course and rules. Each participant will have until 1130 to complete the predicted log sheet. The first boats will depart at 1200. The race will conclude at 1700 at Inati Bay where we will have an award ceremony as well as a potluck meal on the beach. (And don't forget the 13th is the Commodore's Picnic so stay the night) One word of caution - please do not assume that because Inati Bay is the end point that the course will just have a couple of real easy legs…..

Finally, there will be a modest entry fee of $10.00 to help defray the expenses for the trophies and refreshments. This will be payable on the morning of the race.

For those of you who are not sure how to prepare, here are some following hints (by the way, what all this means is you need to have an idea how fast your boat will go at a given RPM - Don't forget -- many of winners are novices just like you, while some of the "scientists" outsmart themselves as they watch their theories on wind and waves disintegrate before their eyes.

CHOOSING A SPEED

The first thing you'll need to do is to determine the speed of your boat. It's nice to have a complete RPM speed curve, although for most contests all you really need to know is your boat's speed at the RPM you intend to use for the contest. Choose a comfortable speed, probably the RPM you normally use for cruising. Keep in mind that during the contest you will need to maintain that speed regardless of sea conditions, so choose a speed where you and your boat won't be knocked about if the water is a bit lumpy. One other consideration, choose an RPM setting that can be easily read on your tachometer(s) so that during the contest you can adjust your throttle(s) to exactly this same RPM.

RUNNING A MILE

The best time to run the mile is in the morning before the course becomes congested with other boats and the winds kick up a chop. Set your throttle(s) carefully and run the course noted on the chart in both directions, without stopping or changing your RPM. Use a stopwatch to measure the exact time it takes you to travel the mile in each direction. The times you record for each direction will probably be different due to wind and current that might be present. Times for multiple runs in the same direction should be nearly the same. Before you go back in, and without changing speed, make some tests to determine how much you must turn your helm so that your boat will make a 180 degree turn in 40 seconds.

CALCULATING AVERAGE SPEED

You will now want to determine the average speed of your boat in seconds per nautical mile (sec./nm). To do this, first convert the times you recorded for each direction into seconds (example: 4 minutes and 25 seconds = 265 seconds). Now, add the times from each direction and divide by two to determine the average speed in seconds per nautical mile (example: 265 + 281 divided by 2 = 273 sec./nm). Later we will use this average value to figure the time needed to travel a given distance by simply multiplying it times the distance (example: 273 sec./m times 3.1 miles = 846 seconds).

PLOTTING THE COURSE

The next step is to plot the contest course. The contest instructions will list the start, intermediate, and finish points. Once you have identified these points on your chart, draw the course lines interconnecting them. Now, measure and note the distance and heading for each leg. When measuring the distance, be very careful to be as precise as possible since any distance errors made now will result as an error in time when the scores are computed. Depending on the chart, you will use either the mileage scale or the latitude scale to measure the distance in nautical miles for each leg. Be sure to convert headings to magnetic course.

CALCULATING LEG TIMES

Calculate the travel time for each leg. Multiply your boat speed in seconds per nautical mile by the leg distance in nautical miles. Since starting and turning actions will add a little extra time, allowances need to be added to the travel times just calculated. Experience has shown that, although it seems short, five seconds is an adequate allowance for starting and should be added to the travel time for the first leg. Turn time varies according to the turn angle. The turn angle is the number of degrees your compass will swing when going from one heading to another. The turn time is not linear so use this table to determine the turn time allowance.

TURN ANGLE ADD
0 to 60 degrees 0 seconds
60 to 90 degrees 5 seconds
90 to 110 degrees 10 seconds
110 to 125 degrees 15 seconds
125 to 140 degrees 20 seconds
140 to 150 degrees 25 seconds
150 to 165 degrees 30 seconds
165 to 175 degrees 35 seconds

Always add the turn-time allowance to the travel time for the leg following the turn.

CONVERT SECONDS TO HOURS, MINUTES, AND SECONDS

Now you have the total times you will predict for each leg of the contest. Converting from seconds to hours, minutes, and seconds will require some mathematical gymnastics. This is best done as follows. If the leg time exceeds 3,600 seconds, subtract 3,600 for each hour in the leg. Now divide the result by 60. The digits to the left of the decimal point are the minutes in the leg. Subtract the minutes from the result so that the number to the left of the decimal point is zero and multiply the decimal value by 60 to find the seconds. You can check your answer by converting it back to seconds. It should agree with your original value.

EXAMPLE: assume leg time is 4317 sec, 4317 - 3600 (1 hour) = 717, 717 / 60 = 11.95 , 11.95 - 11 (11 min) = .95 , .95 x 60 = 57 sec. RESULT : 1:11:57

Sound complicated? Its not. Bring your boat, your Bellingham Bay Chart, and a pencil to the Ward Room on September 12th.

On race day, we will begin at 1000 sharp with a skippers meeting which will be held in the Ward Room at the club. At the skippers meeting, you will be given the course and rules. Each participant will have until 1130 to complete the predicted log sheet. The first boats will depart at 1200. The race will conclude at 1700 at Inati Bay where we will have an award ceremony as well as a potluck meal on the beach. (And don't forget the 13th is the Commodore's Picnic so stay the night) One word of caution - please do not assume that because Inati Bay is the end point that the course will just have a couple of real easy legs…..

Finally, there will be a modest entry fee of $10.00 to help defray the expenses for the trophies and refreshments. This will be payable on the morning of the race.

See you then!


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Fleet Captain's Report

Karen Callery, Fleet Captain

I hope everyone is having a wonderful summer of boating, or just enjoying the great weather. Between racing, cruising and junior events the BYC has been busy. I would like to thank all of you who have participated, volunteered, or supported our summer activities. Without your help our activities couldn't take place.

The Pacific Rim Challenge in Victoria was a memorable experience for all participants. Congratulations to our teams for bringing home the third place trophy.

As I write this I'm watching the 1998 National Junior Sailing Championships on the bay. What a thrill for all to have a regatta of this caliber in Bellingham. A big thanks to Steve Ross and all of his volunteers.

The adults will take to the water on Labor Day weekend for the 25th Annual PITCH Regatta. Even if you're not a racer, stop by the Club on Friday or Saturday nights and join in the fun and activities of this great event at the Breakwater Restaurant.

The weekend of September 12 and 13 brings back the Bellingham Yacht Club's Predicted Log Race, ending at Inati Bay for Sunday's Commodore's Picnic. We will provide the hotdogs, burgers, condiments, corn on the cob, beer, and pop. Everyone else please bring a potluck dish. Please give me a call to volunteer to take items to Inati Bay, to help cook, etc. Karen Callery, 676-0784 (and leave a message please).

See you on the water.


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Junior Sail Fleet Report

Mike Visser, Junior Sail Coach

Once again BYC Juniors Blaine Pedlow and Ryan Zehnder strutted their stuff at the Area H Bemis Cup Qualifiers in Seattle, sailing the 420-class sailboat. Dominating the regatta gave them the opportunity to represent the Northwest and BYC in the U.S. Championships here in August. If you see these two guys around give 'em an "atta boy" because they sure have earned it.

We would like to welcome Ernest Bizzell and parents Larry and Mary to the race team. Ernest took the Lake Padden class last year and is eager to race. He will be racing a Byte.

Hats off to Ashley Hamilton and Evan Rogers who represented BYC at the 1998 Canadian Optimist Provincials. Evan Rogers received the Perpetual Novice award. They both stayed in Vancouver for an additional week of clinics and racing at Royal Van. Evan went on to compete in the Canadian Nationals and found that missing a couple of races can really affect your overall scores.

The race team traveled to Olympia July 18-19 for the annual South Sound Junior Regatta, hosted by Corinthian Sailing Club. Much learning occurred as the shifty winds and current tormented all the sailors. Byte overall: Michael Whitmyer came in 7th, Robin Laskey 9th, and Ernest Bizzell 10th. Mr. Whitmyer had some brilliant top five finishes. The Optimist team did well with Ashley Hamilton taking 4th and Evan Rogers 2nd in the Blue Fleet.

Out next regatta was the USA Junior Olympic Sailing Festival August 22-23 at Mathews Beach on Lake Washington.

Mike Visser just competed in the 1998 Mallory Cup eliminations held in Solings at Orcas Island in West Sound. The 1994 Sears Cup team (Kevin Oliverio, Mike Visser, Dalton Bergan) was reunited for an ultra-competitive elimination series of four races. 1996 and '97 Mallory Cup champion Jeff Eckart (former Olympiad) was present, as well as local hero Ian Wareham (Olympic Soling campaigner), along with another West Sound team. In the end, after a protest hearing, we came out victorious and grasped the spot as Area H representatives for the Mallory Cup August 8-12 in Victoria B.C., sailed in T-Birds. I figure we sailed pretty well considering none of us had ever been in a Soling race before.

Summer Sailing Lessons are winding down and it looks like the race team will be getting about 4 or 5 new members out of the Learn-to-Sail program. Look for these hot sailors coming up the ropes!

Your newly wed coach,
Mike Visser, Junior Sail Coach


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First Mates

Marge Pisarczuk, First Mates President

Hope you all have a wonderful and exciting summer. The weather really did cooperate. Your Board met each month during the summer on Roberta McCord's boat‹having lunch and discussing Board and Club functions.

The September 4th board meeting will again be on the Ebb Tide and we will be voting on two new recommendations: 1. Whether or not to continue the monthly luncheons. 2. That the First Mates Board use their time and energy to support only two BYC committees (Programs & Membership).

Our Board is down to seven members and we do need your help and thoughts to continue. If you are interested in joining us and having a say in these recommendations PLEASE call the BYC office and leave your name and number and we will get back to you.

Our September luncheon will be Thursday the 17th in the Breakwater (UPSTAIRS) at 11:30 am. Call the office to make reservations by Tuesday the 15th. Looking forward to seeing all of you and starting a new social year.


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PITCH! Howdy Sailors!

Alan Callery and Marlene Bolster, Cochairs, PITCH 1998

All of us at the Bellingham Yacht Club are excited to extend an invitation to you to join us in celebrating 25 years of PITCH. Our Silver Anniversary of incredible regattas promises to provide to you the professionalism, excitement, camaraderie, and good times you have learned to expect from PITCH.

And as we sail for action and enjoyment, remember: our partnership with Hospice NW gives the deeper meaning that our fun helps others through difficult times.

So, mark Labor Day weekend, September 4, 5, and 6 on your calendar for the 25th Anniversary of Bellingham Yacht Club's PITCH/Hospice Cup IV Regatta. Register early and we'll see you in September.


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BYC at Center of Junior Sailing World

Steve Ross

All eyes were on Bellingham during the week of August 15-21 as the best of America's junior sailors converged on BYC for the U.S. Sailing Junior Championships. Taking top honors were Laser Sailor John Diskant of California Yacht Club (Carpenteria), 420 sailors Scott Hogan and Amy Halvorsen of Newport Harbor (CA) Yacht Club, and the Santana 20 team of Marcus Eagan, Robert Conrad, and Cardwell Potts of Southern Yacht Club (New Orleans).

Jan Visser, Bob Williamson, and Marlene Bolster lobbied U.S. Sailing last year for the opportunity to host the event‹for the first time ever in sailing's Area H (Pacific Northwest and Hawaii). Once regatta preparations began in earnest, local chairmanship passed to Past Commodore Steve Ross to allow Marlene to focus on the 25th Anniversary PITCH regatta.

An incredible team of volunteers and community organizations supported the event. Al Callery was Primary Race Officer, and assembled two race committees. On the water; RC chairs were John Pedlow, Charlie Guildner, Gary Baker, and Jeff Davis.

Steve Moore was responsible for all motorized craft‹from mark boats to coaches' boats to committee boats. He assembled a fleet of more than 20 boats to support the event, accomplished many changes as requirements were clarified, and never failed to have boats for observers.

Ninety one sailors, sailing 50 boats, from 17 different states arrived Saturday, August 15. They were met by 30 host families recruited by Lisa Black. During their stay in Bellingham, meals were hosted by BYC, the Wheel & Keel Club, Blue Gavel, Squalicum Yacht Club, the Breakwater Restaurant, Coconut Kenny's, and Round Table Pizza.

Breakfasts were arranged by Meredith Ross and lunches were provided by Lynne Hamilton and volunteers from the BYC Youth Fleet. Dave Adams of Baron & Company arranged the best publicity we've ever seen for a BYC event. Keith McLean arranged volunteers to load and unload boats provided by Vanguard. Many other volunteers, too numerous to mention, made the 1998 U.S. Sailing Junior Championships an event to remember.

Competition, Yacht Club, Place, Points, Sailors
Bemis, Bellingham Yacht Club, 15, 137.00, Blaine Pedlow & Ryan Zehnder.

Check the BYC Web site for the full results: http://www.byc.org/sbsresults.html


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Pacific Rim Yachting Challenge '98

Gretchen Erga

The hosts of the Royal Victorian Yacht Club did a magnificent job in laying out the "red carpet treatment² for our six sailors and eight delegates in Victoria, B.C., during the July 11-17 Pacific Rim Challenge. A few practice races were held the first day, and 12 more very competitive races followed over the next six days.

Halfway through the races, everyone took a day off and the hosts treated us to some delightful tours of the Royal Victorian Museum, the IMAX Theater, and the Butchart Gardens. During the evenings, we were treated to dinners and ceremonies, which included live entertainment, music, and dancing.

Our team of six sailors sailed on a different Thunderbird each race. This involved getting used to 12 different boats in a matter of minutes before the start. There were four people on each boat including the boat owner. Keith McLean skippered one of our Bellingham boats with Raymond Nelson and Dawn Durand. David Stephen helmed our other Team USA boat with Wendy Gray and Larry Jones.

Catspaw, Current$ea, Wizard II, and Fantasia, from the Bellingham Yacht Club, were some of the main observation boats. The support team for this international challenge included Lorraine Boland, Alan and Karen Callery, David and Penny Bradley, Keri Stephen, and Brian and Gretchen Erga. The currents and tides were very challenging and Canada had a very distinct home-court advantage. The light winds, 0-10 knots over the weeklong event, were also exasperating for our "down under" friends.

Final results of this fun-filled regatta were: 1st Canada, 2nd New Zealand, 3rd USA, 4th Australia, 5th Russia, and 6th Japan.


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Commodore's Picnic & Commodore's Cup

September 13 at Inati Bay

This cruise will have something for all boaters and guests. Rides will be available for those who need transportation to Inati Bay. Call the BYC office at 733-7390.

The Club will provide beverages and hamburgers and members will be asked to provide salads and desserts.


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